Isle of May

Having been thwarted from my attempt for a May visit to the Farne Islands by a brief spell of terrible weather, I was happy to have a trip to the Isle of May booked days later. The heavy fog in the morning was predicted to lift and so it did, as the boat approached the little island in the Firth of Forth. This small rock, only a couple of kilometres long, hosts a quarter of a million breeding seabirds in the summer. Arctic terns dive bomb the visitors coming off the boat (they have nests by the path) while the female eider ducks sit tight on their nests, relying on camouflage to avoid attention. Most of the action takes place on the guano-covered cliffs – where guillemots, razorbills, shags and kittiwakes raise their young – and in burrows on the cliff edges that puffins build their nests in.

This entry was posted in Birds, Ecology, Wildlife.

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